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IBM Wants More Macs In The Workplace

By on 21/09/2015

Apple and IBM have been working quite closely together this year in an effort to help companies get on board with the Internet of Things. The collaboration involves the promotion of Apple mobile devices in the workplace and the utilization of IBM technology to help employees access high-tech mobile services.

So far, the focus of their partnership has been to introduce several enterprise-focused mobile apps to an array of industries. Last Friday (Aug. 7), IBM revealed another aspect to the Apple partnership: pushing enterprise to adopt the Mac.

Reports by Data Center Knowledge said IBM is introducing new cloud-based IT solutions for businesses that integrate with Mac computers. Up until now, the services had been on a custom basis, but according to reports, the service will now be available to any interested corporate user of IBM’s MobileFire Managed Mobility Services.

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“Today’s announcement is a powerful testament to the growing demand for Apple technology in the enterprise and the strong relationship between IBM and JAMF to help organizations inventory, deploy and secure their Apple devices,” said JAMF Software CEO Dean Hager in a statement. JAMF’s Casper Suite of services will also be integrated into the IT support, reports said.

The initiative is not entirely separate from IBM’s ongoing mobile strategy with Apple as the new IT service can also extend to iPads and iPhones, reports said. But as Apple’s Mac continues to gain popularity over the PC among consumers, IBM and Apple are looking for ways to extend that popularity into the workforce.

One of the biggest ways this has happened is through the Bring Your Own Device movement, which sees employees bringing their own Apple devices for use at work. IBM’s latest initiative makes it easier for businesses to order Macs for their employees and have them automatically set up for their employees.

According to reports, the new service appears to be an extension of IBM’s earlier program, in which the corporation handed out Macs to employees and implemented enterprise-ready security features on the devices.